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There’s now a new reason to make a pilgrimage to Canterbury; the city has three excellent independent record stores, two of them very new, which cover subtly different markets.

Some of the other touristy bits aren’t too bad either!

Dischi toscani in treno

By ProgBlog, Aug 30 2014 04:06PM

I’ve just spent a very enjoyable eight days in Tuscany. Based in Cisanello on the outskirts of Pisa, it was easy to get around the region using the railway system. I love the steep hillsides, with olive groves and vines dappled in warm sunlight and shadows from the cumulus clouds above; the uniform rows of stone pines and fields of sunflower and maize; the ancient hill forts originally occupied by long-passed civilizations.

The ideal holiday should combine a number of things, including appropriate weather (I do like my skiing!), some exercise, some relaxation, some culture, contrasting landscapes, good food. I may be a scientist but I like art and architecture; most of my photographs are architectural when previously they’d been predominantly landscapes. Our summer holiday this year was intended to cover most of the essentials, plus suitable interludes for browsing through the racks in record stores...

I’d put together a list based on personal preferences, descriptions from Andrea Parentin’s Rock Progressivo Italiano and Progressive Italiano by Alessandro Caboli and Giovanni Ottone, amounting to 23 mostly 70s RPI albums that I wanted to buy, believing that I might find maybe five of them. Top of the list was Terra in Bocca by I Giganti, which features prominently in the literature but, from talking to Alessandro Magnani of Pisa’s GAP records as well as hours spent in other music stores, copies are very hard to come by. On this visit to Pisa I didn’t actually buy anything in GAP but I did have quite a good chat with Alessandro. The shop is amazing, not least because Alessandro’s stock includes music he’s not too fond of, it’s full of vinyl and Alessandro can tell you about the style of music on any record. He very kindly played me some of Searching for a Land by the New Trolls which was organ-dominated and more like ELP than the blues-guitar infused proto-prog of the Concerto Grosso. It was evident he also liked prog, recommending Circus 2000 as something I should look out for, but also picking out a single track from an album by a folk artist (I don’t remember the name) that he cited as prog, and it was, but the rest of the album was singer-songwriter easy listening that was of no interest. Flicking through some albums he described one as being ‘very political’ and when pressed, he said it was left-wing, and wouldn’t have anything ‘from the right’. During the time I spent in there, three other audiophiles were browsing the records, asking questions and getting full answers; a truly interactive shop.

Pisa’s other record store, La Galleria del Disco (Sanantonio42 Records Shop seems to have been replaced with a clothes store that sells some music, rather than the other way round) does have a dedicated prog section and, because GAP was closed until a couple of days before we were due to return to the UK, I managed to visit twice and pick up a number of items from my list, plus a CD that wasn’t on my list but did interest me, Atlantide by The Trip (the first album as a keyboard-fronted trio) and a cheap Seventh Sojourn. Upstairs, there’s a fairly impressive selection of new vinyl for sale, indicating that Italians certainly have not fallen out of love with 12” albums and gatefold sleeves. This hypothesis was reinforced by the presence of turntables for sale in a few of the record shops I visited, including a Rega Planar 1 for €299 in Sky Stone & Songs, Lucca. This store has a reasonable collection of prog but it is mixed in with the full range of other Italian artists. Perhaps the most striking feature of the shop was the impressive range of Metal, both on CD and vinyl.

A planned trip to look for sea glass in Antignano allowed me to include a stop in Piccadilly Sound, Livorno. Atlantic Star, 36 properties away on the Via Grande had closed down, but visits to Piccadilly either side of lunch resulted in picking up three titles from my list, plus a fourth thrown in for good measure. Warner has a budget series of 2LP in 1CD and fortunately for me, the two Delirium CDs I’d wanted were included on the one CD. The bonus was the inclusion of Preludio, Tema, Variazione e Canzona on the CD with L’Uomo by Osanna.

The trip to Firenze resulted in another bumper crop, though on arrival I was disappointed with the branch of Galleria del Disco. The sottopassaggio leading out from the station has two stores and it wasn’t until we were returning to the station that we discovered the branch with the dedicated progressive Italiano. Outside of Genova, this is the only record store I’ve found that stocks a good range of BTF CDs, so I crossed another couple of classic albums of my list and indulged in three more recent releases, two from Fabio Zuffanti-related Finisterre and one from another of Zuffanti’s projects, Hostsonaten. I had picked up Fiaba by Procession, something I’d included in my 23, but chose not to buy it because of the absence of keyboards. Firenze is also home to Alberti. I went to the rather large branch in Borgo San Lorenzo, close to the cathedral. The prog was mixed in with other Italian artists and though I didn’t cross off any more titles, I bought myself a special edition 40th anniversary Banco del Mutuo Soccorso that includes three previously unreleased tracks, live tracks and a substantial booklet. I also couldn’t resist picking up a cheap copy of the first Yes album.

All in all this was a very successful holiday, ticking all the right boxes for culture, relaxation, scenery and exercise and also because of achieving 48% of my targeted albums. Tuscany next year?


My purchases were: Franco Battiato, Sulle corded Aries; Alan Sorrenti, Aria; Festa Mobile, Diario di viaggio della Festa mobile; Panna Fredda, Uno; The Trip, Atlantide; Arti+Mestieri, Tilt; Osanna, L’Uomo and Preludio, Tema, Variazione e Canzona; Delirium, Dolce Acqua and Delirium III - Viaggio negli Archipelaghi del Tempo; 40th Anniversary Banco del Mutuo Soccorso’s eponymous first album; Alusa Fallax, Intorno alla mia Cattiva Educazione; Campo di Marte, Campo di Marte; Hostsonaten, Winterthrough; Finisterre, In ogni Luogo and La Meccanica Naturale


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