ProgBlog

By ProgBlog, Apr 1 2020 08:51PM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world



ProgBlog's March acquisitions
ProgBlog's March acquisitions

March additions to the ProgBlog collection, a short list due to constraints imposed to reduce the spread of Covid-19: Garofano Rosso (Vinyl) – Banco del Mutuo Soccorso; Broadcasting from Europa 1 (bootleg) (V) – Pink Floyd; Beaubourg (V) - Vangelis; Star’s End (V) – David Bedford; Casino (V) – Al Dimeola; The Universal Play (V) – Gandalf; Time & Tide (V) – Greenslade; No Smoke Without Fire (V) – Wishbone Ash; Worlds Within (V) – Raphael Weinroth-Browne; The Stone House (Download) – Wingfield Reuter Stavi Sirkis; 20180311 Sono Centrum, Brno (D) – Stick Men; Kopfmensche – Markus Reuter (D); From A Page/In the Present (Live from Lyon) (V+CD) – Yes; Angel’s Egg (V) – Gong; Frozen Radios (D) – [‘ramp]


The recent past


Live report: Lifesigns, The Half Moon, Putney, March 11th


I’m a recent convert to Lifesigns, having re-appraised my original opinion from 2013 or 2014 and really enjoyed their performance at Trading Boundaries last summer. With a few more listens under my belt, I thought the Half Moon gig was better and I put this down to greater familiarity with their material. As much as I liked Trading Boundaries as a venue, I’m not convinced that a post-prandial concert setting is the most conducive for a good atmosphere – those of us who didn’t eat had to stand where we could while waiting staff moved in and out; at the Half Moon there wasn’t too much to-and-froing between the bar and where I was standing. In fact my chosen position afforded an excellent view of three quarters of the band, with only Frosty Beedle obscured behind his drum kit.


Lifesigns at the Half Moon, Putney 11-03-2020
Lifesigns at the Half Moon, Putney 11-03-2020

What was more obvious to me this time was the band’s dual persona: the exceptionally proggy bits (Jon Poole’s excellent bass work at times reminded me of Chris Squire’s approach, and apart from being a very good keyboard player, John Young revealed an exceptionally discerning taste in music on My Prog Five hosted by The Prog Report on YouTube); and the more pop-centric songs like Imagine. That Lifesigns can do pop shouldn’t come as any surprise given the pedigree of the musicians but Imagine, where the Lifesigns trademark vocal harmonies combine with an uplifting melody, could quite easily become a hit single if the right DJs heard it. I played the Imagine video to my wife, who is not a fan of prog, knowing that she’d like it. When I first heard it last year there were sections that reminded me of The Beatles; the first band that comes to mind now is Take That! I don’t mean to put-off diehard prog fans, because they’re a really great live act and most of the music occupies classic prog territory, even when they combine extended workouts with more accessible sections, like on At the End of the World. There was more than one moment during the gig that I was reminded of Yes’ stretched-out sections, not least because of Dave Bainbridge who at times employs a style not unlike Steve Howe. I’m really impressed by Bainbridge, who also plays gorgeous fluid guitar that calls to mind Allan Holdsworth.

This short UK tour included more material from the upcoming album than last year, with Gregarious a recent addition to the set, though favourites from the first album and Cardington were featured. Young has suggested that it’s getting more and more difficult to choose which songs to play, but I’m pleased that that Lighthouse, Cardington and N got an airing.

Considering that concern was growing over the spread of the novel coronavirus Covid-19, the gig was well attended and was very well received by all present


Lifesigns, Half Moon Putney 11-03-2020
Lifesigns, Half Moon Putney 11-03-2020

Covid-19 gig cancellation chaos


The North American leg of the Big Big Train 2020 tour has been cancelled, but the European dates for July are currently still scheduled


HRH Prog 9, scheduled for mid-March but postponed, has now been combined with HRH Prog 10 and rescheduled for October 17th and 18th at the Shepherds Bush Empire, London and the O2 Academy, Sheffield. Tickets and accommodation bookings have been transferred so those who had booked for the March event don’t have to do anything




Van der Graaf Generator have postponed their 2020 European tour. The London show is now scheduled to take place on November 19th. Details can be found here:

http://www.vandergraafgenerator.co.uk/#gigs


The Watch have postponed gigs on their A Prog Journey 1970/1976 tour. They were due to play in the UK in early April, including a show at Trading Boundaries on the 11th. Live music at Trading Boundaries has been suspended until at least the end of May


Available now or soon


Remastered (Download) by Astroligator, versions with and without lyrics (prog metal) – available now via Spotify


Fifth Dimension by Scarlet Moon (prog metal) will be available everywhere(!) from 3/4/20 – see http://scarletmoonmusic.com/ for details


Dante’s Inferno (EP) by Flight of Eden (prog metal) – available 9/4/20 via Bandcamp


All My Yesterdays (book) by Steve Howe will be published on 16th April and is available to pre-order from Burning Shed



Nostalgia for Infinity (CD) by Hats Off Gentlemen it’s Adequate (prog/alt-rock) – available 6/5/20 via Bandcamp









By ProgBlog, Mar 9 2020 10:23PM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world


Latest additions to the ProgBlog collection, primarily garnered from three sources (Black Widow Records, Genoa; Burning Shed; and via the artists themselves through Bandcamp: Collegium Musicum (CD) - Collegium Musicum; Görlitz (CD) – Pulsar; Il Segno del Comando (CD) - Il Segno del Comando; Waterloo Lily (Vinyl) – Caravan; Principe di un Giorno (V) – Celeste; III or Viaggio negli Arcipelaghi del Tempo (V) - Delirium; Maxophone (V) – Maxophone; Il Paese dei Balocchi (V) - Il Paese dei Balocchi; Il Volto Verdi (V) – Il Segno del Comando; Ile de Fièvre (V) – Shylock; Music for Airports (V) – Brian Eno; Live at Coventry Cathedral (CD) – Travis & Fripp; Present from Nancy (V) – Supersister; Worlds Within (CD) – Raphael Weinroth-Browne; Depth of Field (V) – Kaprekar’s Constant; Exsolve (V) – Jo Quail


Jo Quail postcard
Jo Quail postcard

Jo Quail postcard (back)
Jo Quail postcard (back)


The recent past


Live report: Banco del Mutuo Soccorso + Il Segno del Comando, Politeama Genovese, February 5th


Banco del Mutuo Soccorso have been touring 2019’s Transiberiana around major cities in Italy and after reading that there were plans for co-founder Gianni Nocenzi to perform alongside his brother Vittorio Nocenzi at the Genoa concert on 5th February – after leaving Banco in 1985 he has only made very rare appearances with the band – I thought that I’d sign-up for what was billed as an extraordinary, unforgettable event. I was also seduced by the support act, Genovese dark prog band Il Segno del Comando which I’d wanted to see for some time

I saw Banco in Brescia in January 2018 but didn’t manage to catch the full set, having left early to ensure I could get a taxi back to my hotel. This proved to be no problem in Genoa because the concert was being held at the Politeama Genovese, a 1000 seat theatre next door to the hotel where I always stay when I’m in Genoa. This in turn proved to be a bonus, as the band and manager Lorella Brambilla were staying at the same Hotel – I spoke to drummer Fabio Moresco immediately after I’d checked-in when I held the lift for him (he commented on my just-purchased copy of Prog Italia) and later met Lorella and Vittorio Nocenzi as I was returning from a pilgrimage to Black Widow Records. The friendliness and kindness of Italian musicians never ceases to amaze me


BMS poster, Politeama Genovese
BMS poster, Politeama Genovese

The more formal setting of the concert meant it started on time, with a short but enjoyable set from Il Segno del Comando. I wasn’t familiar with their music, having only acquired their first, self titled album and Il Volto Verdi on that trip, but I had been intrigued by the description provided by Black Widow Records’ Massimo Gasperini as ‘dark, like Van der Graaf Generator.’ The band is named after the successful 1971 giallo television series and novel of the same name by Giuseppe D'Agata, the one constant in a line-up that has changed beyond recognition since Il Segno del Comando formed in 1995 is bassist Diego Banchero, who has impressive connections within the Genoa music scene. The current personnel remain unchanged since 2018’s L'Incanto Dello Zero. Joining Banchero were Davide Bruzzi (guitars, keyboards); Fernando Cherchi (drums); Roberto Lucanato (guitars); Beppi Menozzi (keyboards); and Riccardo Morello (vocals)


46 years since their self-titled debut Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, the BMS set mixed 70’s classics with highlights from 2019’s Transiberiana. Last year’s offering marked the first new album for 25 years, the last studio album 13 being released in 1994, and Vittorio Nocenzi made a conscious effort to produce something that captured the original Banco spirit, albeit with an updated sound and clean production. Along with Nocenzi (piano, keyboards and voice) who has been guiding Banco since it was founded were Filippo Marcheggiani (lead guitar), Nicola Di Gia (rhythm guitar), Marco Capozi (bass), Fabio Moresco (ex-Metamorfosi, drums), and Tony D'Alessio (lead vocal.) Unfortunately Gianni Nocenzi did not appear but that didn’t detract from the spectacle or quality of the evening’s music. I thought they were going to begin with Transiberiana opener Stelle Sulla Terra but that proved to be a tease, as the opening bars transformed into Metamorfosi then subsequently taking us through more of the eponymous debut LP, selections from Darwin!, Io Sono Nato Librero and Transiberiana. The music wasn’t the only entertainment – Nocenzi also tells a good story, affecting a cod-Genoese accent and attitude which had my (Genoese) friends laughing out loud, getting political (my sort of politics), and then disparaging the quality and content of the Sanremo music festivals. Each song was performed with consummate skill, the early pieces varying from the album versions due to the different conformations of the band over 40+ years and D’Alessio, who has a fine voice, not even considering the fruitless task of sounding like Francesco di Giacomo. Banco are right up there with the cream of progressive rock, not just progressivo italiano. At times you can hear hints of ELP in the organ and piano but they are so much more than an ELP-school group. More rocking than many of their original Italian contemporaries their social commentary was spot on in the 70s and remains so today. If you’ve not heard any Banco del Mutuo Soccorso you need to buy some of their albums; if you’ve not seen them play live, you should make every endeavour to do so. Is anyone up for hosting Banco in the UK?




Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Genoa 5/2/20
Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Genoa 5/2/20

Big Big Train and The Passengers Club


The Passengers Club, a new forum for Big Big Train fans was launched on February 14th.

Membership of the Passengers Club gives listeners a chance to get behind the scenes in the world of Big Big Train. Club members will be able to hear early demos from the writing and recording stages of their studio releases and demos of songs that got lost along the way, including some tracks from an abandoned concept album that they were working on a few years ago. There will be films of the band backstage, recording in the studio, and during rehearsals and soundchecks. There will also be exclusive photo galleries, blog posts, Facebook Q & As, and other good things. Membership costs £30 for one year, or £50 for two years and full details of how to sign up, what is on offer, and the reasons for starting the Passengers Club can be found at https://thepassengersclub.com

By ProgBlog, Feb 1 2020 12:28AM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world


Latest additions to the ProgBlog collection: A Song for All Seasons (Vinyl) – Renaissance; Prélude au Sommeil (V) – Jean-Jacques Perrey; Until All the Ghosts Have Gone (V) - Anekdoten; Sky Over Giza (V) – La Morte Viene Dallo Spazio; Crossover (CD) by David Cross and Peter Banks; Tarquahet (download) – TEAR (Reuter & Wingfield); I Can See Your House From Here (V) - Camel; Camembert Electrique (V) - Gong; Platinum (V) – Mike Oldfield; Variations (V) – Andrew Lloyd Webber; Spiral (V) – Vangelis; Thrak (V) – King Crimson



Prélude au Sommeil is the debut recording from Jean-Jacques Perrey (released 1958.) The two side-long tracks feature George Jenny's 'Ondioline', an early electronic instrument, resulting in dreamy soundscapes that are hymnal, sometimes fun, and occasionally reminiscent of Vernon Elliott's music for Smallfilms productions. It's a remarkable piece of work pre-dating the minimalism of Philip Glass and Terry Riley and influencing the ambient works of Brian Eno. The blurb attached to the shrinkwrap tells an interesting tale about the music being used to calm patients in psychiatric hospitals but casts doubt on its veracity!



The recent past


Crossover (David Cross and Peter Banks, released 17/1/20)

Crossover is the latest release from David Cross in collaboration with former Yes guitarist Peter Banks.

Recorded in 2010, three years before the death of Banks, the violin-guitar improvisations that form the basis of the album have been enhanced by collaboration with Yes and King Crimson alumni and co-produced by Tony Lowe (who also added bass, keyboards and string parts.) It's a rewarding listening experience and an excellent addition to any prog collection


Worlds Within by Raphael Weinroth-Browne released 24/1/20

Raphael Weinroth-Browne is a cellist and composer from Canada (The Visit, Musk Ox, Kamancello) who has just released Worlds Within, a single 40-minute entirely instrumental composition broken up into 10 movements that flow in a continuous sequence, where all the sounds were created on cello with amplification and effects pedals. The music combines sounds reminiscent of contemporary classical minimalism, metal, post-rock, and electronic music, but doesn't fit squarely into any of these categories. The music gradually branches out and recreating itself in different forms, and Weinroth-Browne has referred to it as the soundtrack to a life cycle, beginning from an unending ether (Unending I), emerging into innocence and wonder (From Within), growing into self-awareness (From Above) followed by chaos and upheaval (Tumult), making peace with what is (Fade [Afterglow]), and returning to the infinite (Unending II). The unendings were composed to feel timeless and to reflect the passing of time from the perspective of nature wheras the inner sections to have a fast-paced momentum, embodying human subjectivity and impatience.


Listen to From Within here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xE3qm74rSg



Coming up


Shipwrecked by Zac (to be released 1/2/20)

For those who like the post-rock wavelengths of the prog spectrum, there's a short but interesting new single Shipwrecked that reminds me of Howard Shore's score for David Cronenberg's film adaptation of Crash by JG Ballard: sparse, evocative and atmospheric

Listen to it here www.distrokid.com/hyperfollow/zac6/shipwrecked


Banco del Mutuo Soccorso + Il Segno del Comando, Politeama Genovese, February 5th



Banco del Mutuo Soccorso are touring their 2019 album Transiberiana around major cities in Italy. They play Genoa on 5th February.

This is an extraordinary event which promises to be unforgettable for all fans: on this occasion co-founder Gianni Nocenzi will perform on stage together with the band led by Vittorio Nocenzi - after leaving Banco in 1985 he has only made very rare appearances with Banco.

Along with Vittorio Nocenzi (piano, keyboards and voice) who has been guiding Banco since its inception are Filippo Marcheggiani (electric guitar), Nicola Di Gia (rhythm guitar), Marco Capozi (bass), Fabio Moresco (ex-Metamorfosi, drums), and Tony D'Alessio (lead vocal)

Transiberiana marks Banco's first new album 25 years after the last studio album 13, released in 1994, and 46 years since their self-titled debut Banco del Mutuo Soccorso.

Banco will be supported by Genovese prog band Il Segno del Comando


Complete the Connection by Altostratus (to be released 7/2/20)

Newcastle based instrumental prog metal band Altostratus are due to release their debut album Complete the Connection on 7th Feb with a launch gig at Head of Steam, Newcastle on 5th Feb. Their music will appeal to fans of PERIPHERY, TESSERACT, SPASTIC INK and GORDIAN KNOT








By ProgBlog, Jan 1 2019 05:22PM

2018. A year like no other, with global politics stooping to a new nadir as so-called world leaders lie, cheat and bully their way through life. I’ve always tended towards optimism, which is one of the reasons I have an affinity for progressive rock, but when humanity is fast-approaching the point where man-made climate change is going to have irreversible, accelerated effects on the biosphere and some of the largest economies in the world argue about the wording of a document at the end of the (extended) COP24 Climate Conference in Katowice relating to the implementation of the 2015 Paris agreement, I may have reached my personal tipping point. For the US, Russia, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, with tacit encouragement from Australia and Brazil, joining forces to prevent the conference fully embracing the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) findings that any warming of above 1.5oC of pre-industrial levels would be disastrous for many species seems criminal to me. As forest fires rage across California and Australia and Japan once again break their local temperature records, it’s time surely for anyone with children or grandchildren to think globally and, at the earliest opportunity, use the ballot box to facilitate change.


The Guardian headline 15 December 2018
The Guardian headline 15 December 2018

Change appears to be the kryptonite of anyone with a vested interest. Colonial expansion allowed Europeans to profit from indigenous mineral wealth with little or no trickle-down benefit for locals (usually the opposite); the dirty energy that fuelled the industrial revolution made a small number of people very rich; the sell-off of former Soviet state industries made a smaller number of people super-wealthy; now our fondness for technology has created an even smaller group of unimaginably rich who are responsible for the way we get our information. I’m not going to deny that there’s no philanthropic disbursement of funds but however well-founded donations are, there’s always a return for the sponsor through free advertising and access to political power, and even something as outwardly benign as the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has come under scrutiny for purportedly cornering the market on global health issues. Thanks to some stunning work by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), it has been revealed that the accumulation of wealth by a limited proportion of the global population, including politicians, is driven by self-interest and that they utilise schemes which although falling within the letter of the law, are actually complex constructs to preserve that wealth and ergo, influence or power. The employment of offshore structures is the equivalent of smoke and mirrors, a device to distract and confuse and ultimately avoid transparency; the influence is exerted to avoid regulation, the same red tape that might have prevented the Bhopal disaster, the Sandoz chemical spill, the Deepwater Horizon explosion, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the Flint, Michigan water crisis and many others. There’s a salutary lesson here: cutting regulations may save you money, but cutting costs may cost lives.


Climate change appears to be rather low on the UK government’s list of priorities, along with rising homelessness and providing appropriate care for the elderly, those with disabilities and the unwell. Currently paralysed in a mess of her own making, bounded by red lines and surrounded by a party disunited over Europe, the Prime Minister continues to rely on DUP MPs to hold the government together even as she decries almost half of the population who voted to remain in the EU as undemocratic for suggesting a second referendum; her pro-Brexit allies from Northern Ireland don’t actually represent the majority ‘remain’ sentiment to be found in the province but she continues to allow them to hold her to ransom. It’s easy for critics of Jeremy Corbyn to lambast him for not holding Theresa May fully to account for her Brexit bungling but there are some equally pressing issues which, if satisfactorily addressed, might persuade those who voted to leave that their voice is being heard and that there was nothing to gain from leaving the EU. If May had taken more of a consensus approach to work out the best solution for the country and not attempted the impossible, the reconciliation of the pro- and anti-Europe wings of the Conservative party, the UK might not be three months away from the worst possible scenario – no deal.


Extrapolating from what I’ve seen in Prog magazine and in tweets posted by the individuals I follow on Twitter, I imagine that the majority of UK prog musicians are in favour of remaining within the EU. The challenge of restriction to movement throughout Europe effectively putting a kibosh on touring the mainland continent for all but the best resourced bands by erecting barriers to seamless touring not seen since the early 1970s, cutting off a previously accessible market. The reciprocal arrangement will undoubtedly deter artists from some of our former EU partners from gigging in the UK. The following argument could be made by not only anyone who has enjoyed the benefits of cheap intracontinental travel but by NHS senior managers, hoteliers and other owners of hospitality, catering or drinks businesses, even farmers requiring a large seasonal workforce; any restriction or barrier to EU citizens working in the UK is going to have an adverse effect on our daily lives, whether that’s longer waiting times in hospitals, no one to staff care homes for our elderly relatives, food shortages and concomitant rising prices, or just finding it harder to enjoy a night out. Doesn’t that make us look grown-up?

The Brexit-fantasy nostalgia even puts my infatuation with 70’s prog in the shade. I resent the barriers being erected that will inconvenience me on my quest to witness the last few classic progressivo Italiano bands I’ve not yet seen, and flourishing my blue UK passport at the end of a slow-moving immigration queue at Genoa’s Cristoforo Colombo airport isn’t actually something I’m going to feel proud about.


2018 did turn out to be good for one thing; the number of concerts I managed to attend (22) was the most I’ve ever managed in a year; I had thought 2017 was busy with 14 (that’s including two days in Genoa for the Porto Antico Prog Fest and five nights in Rome for the Progressivamente festival.) At times it felt as though I was chasing gigs and was certainly flagging by the end of March. Having recommenced semi-retirement towards the end of 2017, it became easier to take extended weekend breaks so on my return from a midweek skiing trip to Chamonix in early January I discovered that Banco del Mutuo Soccorso had a gig in Brescia the following week which, thanks to its proximity to Milan, made travel arrangements relatively easy.


ProgBlog's list of gigs, 2018
ProgBlog's list of gigs, 2018

The true gig marathon began on the 23rd March with my second venture to the Fabio Zuffanti-organised Z-Fest in Milan and ended with my first attendance at a Tangerine Dream performance at the Union Chapel, Islington, on 23rd April. Between those dates I got to see Yes at the Palladium, the first of Steven Wilson’s three nights’ residency at the Royal Albert Hall, had a week skiing in Austria after which I dropped off my gear and immediately headed out to the ESP 22 Layers of Sunlight launch party at the Half Moon, Putney, and flew off to Brescia again, this time for another classic Italian prog band, Le Orme, who were augmented by David Cross on violin. The complexities of getting back the hotel from some of these Italian venues can be something of a logistical nightmare after public transport has shut down for the night. Walking the streets of Genoa after a show poses no threat when the club or theatre is in the heart of the city but the 11km between L’ Angelo Azzurro and the NH Genova Centro, though only a 90 minute walk at most, might not be the best idea at 2am. I am deeply indebted to Marina Montobbio for arranging my lift back from an excellent gig. BMS at Brescia would have been less problematic if I hadn’t followed my wife’s instructions not to use public transport to get back to our hotel. Circolo Colony, the venue for the show, was hidden away on an industrial estate about 20 minutes walk from the light rail terminus to the east of the city. Though the last train was scheduled for 1am, the walk to the station would have involved a section behind the Armco protection from a dual carriageway, so I was told to get a taxi. I had pre-programmed a mobile phone app to get my return cab but despatch phoned me to tell me nothing was available at the time I requested, 00:45am, and the last taxi was at midnight. Apart from missing a chunk of the BMS set, I had to hang around the car park for almost half an hour and had to phone the company to ask where the driver was. When he appeared, it turned out that he was familiar with progressive rock so the journey back to the hotel wasn’t unpleasant. On my return to the city three months later I’d worked out not to bother trying to pre-book a return taxi journey. I made a note of where the taxi dropped me off on the way to the Brixia Forum, returned to that spot at the conclusion of the performance, and called a taxi; mine was the third to arrive. As a result of making the trip for the BMS gig, I was able to explore more of Italy. I really like Brescia with its three record stores (special mention has to go to Kandinski, Via Tartaglia 49c, 25100 Brescia) but it also hosts a UNESCO World Heritage site and the railway provides easy access to other cities including Cremona, and to Lake Garda.


While the variety of live events I attended spanned the inaugural local electronica festival (part three of Palace Electrics was held at Antenna Studios, Crystal Palace and included an interpretation of Steve Reich’s Pendulum Music) to Camel at the Royal Albert Hall and the fabulous Lucca Summer Festival for an outdoor experience of King Crimson, I was also being exposed to a lot more music that I’d describe as being outside my comfort zone. Requests for me to review new music, which came from all parts of the prog spectrum, led to the creation of a new section on the ProgBlog website, DISCovery, which had the aim of exposing new artists to a wider audience. So far it has featured a diverse range of styles including classic Floyd-like soundscape prog, pop-prog, prog with a metal bias, and RIO-inflicted free jazz.

I hope that my contribution to the prog world, however small, inspires someone to go out and explore, whether that’s just the sonic adventure of trying something new or a geographical quest to unearth the inspiration behind the music, where an understanding of physical and cultural artefacts help to piece the world together. 2019 certainly needs everyone to display a little more understanding.


Wishing everyone a peaceful new year.







By ProgBlog, Nov 19 2018 02:31PM



Contrary to my previous pronouncements about the availability of prog in Venice, I can now reveal that there is a relatively new record store in the city, Living in the Past, Sestiere Dorsoduro 3474, 30123 Venezia, and it’s pretty good. Venice was where I first made a conscious effort to collect Italian prog, in 2005, when there were two shops to choose from. My diary from that particular trip reveals that sometime after lunch on Wednesday 13th July, the second day of the holiday (my wife’s first time in Venice), we began winding our way back towards San Marco via the side streets of Dorsoduro, a slow but purposeful journey in the afternoon heat. Anyone familiar with the city will appreciate how you find yourself doubling back on your tracks as you seek a bridge over a canal so that what looks like a straightforward journey on a map devoid of detail is in fact fiendishly complex. I maintain that undertaking adventures through Venice’s maze-like alleys is the best way to explore the unique city, where you come across well-known tourist spots and less recognised gems by accident. That particular trek resulted in the discovery of what looked like prog heaven, despite its name: Discoland, a music shop with all manner of progressive rock CDs in the window, including the entire 2005 re-mastered catalogue of Van der Graaf Generator; Egg; King Crimson; Gentle Giant; Steve Hackett and more... but it was closed for lunch! A quick check of the time revealed that the store was due to reopen in 15 minutes so I popped into the Leonardo da Vinci exhibition in the Chiesa di San Barnaba until the shop owner returned, late. I asked if he had any Italian prog, but he said no. Rooting around did reveal that he had a couple of CDs by The Trip so I picked out Caronte, reissued in a cardboard sleeve, the first Egg album, and The Least we can do is Wave to Each Other, H to He, Pawn Hearts and Godbluff from the VdGG selection.


Though considered a classic progressivo Italiano record, I’m not actually such a great fan of Caronte (1971), a concept album based on the ferryman character Charon from Dante’s Divine Comedy who initially objects to taking Aeneas, a living man, on his boat; Charon is re-interpreted by The Trip as a metaphor for conformity. It’s steeped with psyche/blues characteristic of proto-prog, so comes across as more Iron Butterfly than The Nice. The Trip were actually founded in London in 1966 and included Ritchie Blackmore on guitar but the future Deep Purple guitarist had departed before the arrival of Joe Vescovi, whose keyboard style, influenced by Keith Emerson, is the best feature of the band. The other Venice music shop was Parole & Musica in the Castello Sestiere where I bought an early PFM live compilation The Beginning 1971-1972 Italian Tour. A day trip to Treviso on that 2005 holiday also involved finding a record shop where I bought Concerto Grosso n.1 and 2 by New Trolls, the very disappointing Donna Plautilla by Banco, and an album I’d really wanted to buy in Venice itself, Contrappunti by Le Orme, because that was where the band formed. Originally a beat group, they underwent some personnel changes and then released what many regard to be the first RPI album, Collage, in 1971. I managed to get to see the current incarnation earlier this year in Brescia with David Cross as a guest musician. The album that I most associate with the city is actually Le Orme’s Florian, released in 1979, named after Caffè Florian, alleged to be the oldest establishment of its kind in Europe, dating from 1720 and located under the Procuratie Nuove in piazza San Marco. A two-year hiatus following 1977’s Storia o Leggenda allowed the group to prepare for what seemed like a radical departure from progressive rock, where the electronic instrumentation was replaced with acoustic and early instruments. The result is still recognisable as Orme (they dropped the definite article from their name for the release) even though it should more correctly be referred to as chamber music or chamber prog; the original idea is said to have come from keyboard player Tony Pagliuca who realised that audiences were turning away from prog but didn’t want to subscribe to the mediocrity of commercial pop. The pieces on the album are effectively a protest against destructive economic forces within the music industry and those in the wider world choking other aspects of Italian culture. The lack of a record shop on the island(s) meant I had to look elsewhere for a copy, eventually finding the CD in Vicenza’s Saxophone record store on a day trip out from Venice in 2014; I found a second-hand vinyl copy earlier this year, on Record Store Day, on a stall in Cremona.



I spent a couple of days in Venice during the summer of 1980 on a month-long Interrail trip, staying on Giudecca in a youth hostel, and was blown away by the city. During that stay PFM were playing somewhere in Mestre but I didn’t have the wherewithal to organise getting to see them. On 15th July 1989 Pink Floyd famously played on a barge floating in the Grand Canal, nearing the end of the Momentary Lapse of Reason tour. This was broadcast live on Italian TV and precise timing restrictions meant that some songs had to be curtailed before their natural ending. I recorded this performance when it was shown on UK TV but that disappeared in a clear out of VHS tapes years ago – it’s now available as an unofficial DVD release Pink Floyd ‎– Pazzia & Passione - Live In Venice '89 from Room 101 Entertainment.

The closest I ever got to live prog in Venice was seeing the construction of a stage for Peter Gabriel playing an open air concert in piazza San Marco in 2007; we were staying less than 50m away in the Albergo San Marco but our flight back to the UK was a matter of hours before the performance – apparently Signal to Noise and Washing of the Water were played at the sound check in the early afternoon, where Gabriel acknowledged the fans who had begun to gather around the square after realising that he was present on stage. If that had happened in the last couple of years I’d have found accommodation for an extra night and bought a flight for the following day.






Despite the presence of Living in the Past and the historic connection of Le Orme to the city, Venice doesn’t really appear to have much of a connection with the modern prog scene apart from being somewhere bands like to perform – King Crimson finishing their mainland continental European tour with two dates at the end of July this year at Teatro La Fenice, for example. The ubiquitous newsstands of Italian cities, normally packed full of journals and periodicals, handy for picking up copies of Prog Italia and maybe the DeAgostini classic rock progressivo 180g vinyl reissues, are filled with tourist tat in Venice. Last year my wife found a copy of Prog Italia on Lido for me but there was nothing on any newsstand in any of the main Sestiere this year, or in any of the larger Tabacchi.


Apart from the basic accommodation on Giudecca, I’ve previously only stayed at hotels close to the piazza San Marco when visiting Venice. This trip was a departure from that norm, splashing out on an NH hotel in Dorsoduro abutting neighbouring Santa Croce, an area largely tourist-free but filled with students; there are two universities in the area, Università Ca’ Foscari and IUAV, the architecture school, contributing to the really good vibe. There’s a relative paucity of Venetian gothic and a noticeable presence of more modern architecture, which may explain the lack of visitor interest despite its proximity to the cruise ship terminal, Santa Lucia station and the bus terminus, one of only two places where cars are allowed (the other being Lido) but there are still dozens of friendly restaurants and bars where an Aperol spritz is half the price you pay in London. It wasn’t supposed to be a prog trip – we’d gone for the Architecture Biennale – but there does seem to be more than a passing link between architecture and prog, beginning with the early years of Pink Floyd at Regent Street Polytechnic.


However far removed from modern prog, the city is still able to turn up references to the genre in some of the oddest places. Hats Off Gentlemen it’s Adequate have just released a new CD, Out of Mind which includes the track De Humani Corporis Fabrica, named after Andreas Vesalius' treatise on human anatomy from 1543 which challenged the prevailing doctrine proposed by the Greek physician Galen in the second century AD. I’m a particular fan of the song because it features some of Kathryn Thomas’ gorgeous flute and also includes a passage in 13/4 time, so when I came across the Mario Botta Architects’ installation in the Corderie at the Arsenale, a tactile, circular timber structure where the work of students was presented as tabernacle-like architectural research, I was amazed to find a section labelled De Humani Corporis Fabrica!


Like all cities Venice continues to change. Living in the Past was previously a second hand bookstore but was revamped in 2017 as a shop selling books and second-hand vinyl. There’s a decent selection of Italian prog along with a good selection of international prog and classic rock. Handily, it was a five minute walk from the hotel where we were staying and though I didn’t imagine that I’d find any records on this trip, I still had my cotton LP bag to hand for my purchases: Par les Fils de Mandrin by Ange and David Gilmour’s About Face, an album I’ve never physically owned in any format but once had a tape recorded from a friend’s LP. The shop is certainly a welcome addition to the Venetian landscape, a retail gem amongst some of the most stunning architecture in the world.








The blogs HRH Prog 4 Line Up (F+B) Keith Emerson at the Barbican Z fest ticket BMS Brescia A Saucerful of Secrets banner

Welcome to ProgBlog

 

ProgBlog's lockdown solution to a lack of live concerts - likely to be the last part of the economy to be re-started - is a list of ten of the best lives albums

 

This is the first five...

Banco ticket 050220