ProgBlog

By ProgBlog, Apr 1 2020 08:51PM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world



ProgBlog's March acquisitions
ProgBlog's March acquisitions

March additions to the ProgBlog collection, a short list due to constraints imposed to reduce the spread of Covid-19: Garofano Rosso (Vinyl) – Banco del Mutuo Soccorso; Broadcasting from Europa 1 (bootleg) (V) – Pink Floyd; Beaubourg (V) - Vangelis; Star’s End (V) – David Bedford; Casino (V) – Al Dimeola; The Universal Play (V) – Gandalf; Time & Tide (V) – Greenslade; No Smoke Without Fire (V) – Wishbone Ash; Worlds Within (V) – Raphael Weinroth-Browne; The Stone House (Download) – Wingfield Reuter Stavi Sirkis; 20180311 Sono Centrum, Brno (D) – Stick Men; Kopfmensche – Markus Reuter (D); From A Page/In the Present (Live from Lyon) (V+CD) – Yes; Angel’s Egg (V) – Gong; Frozen Radios (D) – [‘ramp]


The recent past


Live report: Lifesigns, The Half Moon, Putney, March 11th


I’m a recent convert to Lifesigns, having re-appraised my original opinion from 2013 or 2014 and really enjoyed their performance at Trading Boundaries last summer. With a few more listens under my belt, I thought the Half Moon gig was better and I put this down to greater familiarity with their material. As much as I liked Trading Boundaries as a venue, I’m not convinced that a post-prandial concert setting is the most conducive for a good atmosphere – those of us who didn’t eat had to stand where we could while waiting staff moved in and out; at the Half Moon there wasn’t too much to-and-froing between the bar and where I was standing. In fact my chosen position afforded an excellent view of three quarters of the band, with only Frosty Beedle obscured behind his drum kit.


Lifesigns at the Half Moon, Putney 11-03-2020
Lifesigns at the Half Moon, Putney 11-03-2020

What was more obvious to me this time was the band’s dual persona: the exceptionally proggy bits (Jon Poole’s excellent bass work at times reminded me of Chris Squire’s approach, and apart from being a very good keyboard player, John Young revealed an exceptionally discerning taste in music on My Prog Five hosted by The Prog Report on YouTube); and the more pop-centric songs like Imagine. That Lifesigns can do pop shouldn’t come as any surprise given the pedigree of the musicians but Imagine, where the Lifesigns trademark vocal harmonies combine with an uplifting melody, could quite easily become a hit single if the right DJs heard it. I played the Imagine video to my wife, who is not a fan of prog, knowing that she’d like it. When I first heard it last year there were sections that reminded me of The Beatles; the first band that comes to mind now is Take That! I don’t mean to put-off diehard prog fans, because they’re a really great live act and most of the music occupies classic prog territory, even when they combine extended workouts with more accessible sections, like on At the End of the World. There was more than one moment during the gig that I was reminded of Yes’ stretched-out sections, not least because of Dave Bainbridge who at times employs a style not unlike Steve Howe. I’m really impressed by Bainbridge, who also plays gorgeous fluid guitar that calls to mind Allan Holdsworth.

This short UK tour included more material from the upcoming album than last year, with Gregarious a recent addition to the set, though favourites from the first album and Cardington were featured. Young has suggested that it’s getting more and more difficult to choose which songs to play, but I’m pleased that that Lighthouse, Cardington and N got an airing.

Considering that concern was growing over the spread of the novel coronavirus Covid-19, the gig was well attended and was very well received by all present


Lifesigns, Half Moon Putney 11-03-2020
Lifesigns, Half Moon Putney 11-03-2020

Covid-19 gig cancellation chaos


The North American leg of the Big Big Train 2020 tour has been cancelled, but the European dates for July are currently still scheduled


HRH Prog 9, scheduled for mid-March but postponed, has now been combined with HRH Prog 10 and rescheduled for October 17th and 18th at the Shepherds Bush Empire, London and the O2 Academy, Sheffield. Tickets and accommodation bookings have been transferred so those who had booked for the March event don’t have to do anything




Van der Graaf Generator have postponed their 2020 European tour. The London show is now scheduled to take place on November 19th. Details can be found here:

http://www.vandergraafgenerator.co.uk/#gigs


The Watch have postponed gigs on their A Prog Journey 1970/1976 tour. They were due to play in the UK in early April, including a show at Trading Boundaries on the 11th. Live music at Trading Boundaries has been suspended until at least the end of May


Available now or soon


Remastered (Download) by Astroligator, versions with and without lyrics (prog metal) – available now via Spotify


Fifth Dimension by Scarlet Moon (prog metal) will be available everywhere(!) from 3/4/20 – see http://scarletmoonmusic.com/ for details


Dante’s Inferno (EP) by Flight of Eden (prog metal) – available 9/4/20 via Bandcamp


All My Yesterdays (book) by Steve Howe will be published on 16th April and is available to pre-order from Burning Shed



Nostalgia for Infinity (CD) by Hats Off Gentlemen it’s Adequate (prog/alt-rock) – available 6/5/20 via Bandcamp









By ProgBlog, Mar 9 2020 10:23PM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world


Latest additions to the ProgBlog collection, primarily garnered from three sources (Black Widow Records, Genoa; Burning Shed; and via the artists themselves through Bandcamp: Collegium Musicum (CD) - Collegium Musicum; Görlitz (CD) – Pulsar; Il Segno del Comando (CD) - Il Segno del Comando; Waterloo Lily (Vinyl) – Caravan; Principe di un Giorno (V) – Celeste; III or Viaggio negli Arcipelaghi del Tempo (V) - Delirium; Maxophone (V) – Maxophone; Il Paese dei Balocchi (V) - Il Paese dei Balocchi; Il Volto Verdi (V) – Il Segno del Comando; Ile de Fièvre (V) – Shylock; Music for Airports (V) – Brian Eno; Live at Coventry Cathedral (CD) – Travis & Fripp; Present from Nancy (V) – Supersister; Worlds Within (CD) – Raphael Weinroth-Browne; Depth of Field (V) – Kaprekar’s Constant; Exsolve (V) – Jo Quail


Jo Quail postcard
Jo Quail postcard

Jo Quail postcard (back)
Jo Quail postcard (back)


The recent past


Live report: Banco del Mutuo Soccorso + Il Segno del Comando, Politeama Genovese, February 5th


Banco del Mutuo Soccorso have been touring 2019’s Transiberiana around major cities in Italy and after reading that there were plans for co-founder Gianni Nocenzi to perform alongside his brother Vittorio Nocenzi at the Genoa concert on 5th February – after leaving Banco in 1985 he has only made very rare appearances with the band – I thought that I’d sign-up for what was billed as an extraordinary, unforgettable event. I was also seduced by the support act, Genovese dark prog band Il Segno del Comando which I’d wanted to see for some time

I saw Banco in Brescia in January 2018 but didn’t manage to catch the full set, having left early to ensure I could get a taxi back to my hotel. This proved to be no problem in Genoa because the concert was being held at the Politeama Genovese, a 1000 seat theatre next door to the hotel where I always stay when I’m in Genoa. This in turn proved to be a bonus, as the band and manager Lorella Brambilla were staying at the same Hotel – I spoke to drummer Fabio Moresco immediately after I’d checked-in when I held the lift for him (he commented on my just-purchased copy of Prog Italia) and later met Lorella and Vittorio Nocenzi as I was returning from a pilgrimage to Black Widow Records. The friendliness and kindness of Italian musicians never ceases to amaze me


BMS poster, Politeama Genovese
BMS poster, Politeama Genovese

The more formal setting of the concert meant it started on time, with a short but enjoyable set from Il Segno del Comando. I wasn’t familiar with their music, having only acquired their first, self titled album and Il Volto Verdi on that trip, but I had been intrigued by the description provided by Black Widow Records’ Massimo Gasperini as ‘dark, like Van der Graaf Generator.’ The band is named after the successful 1971 giallo television series and novel of the same name by Giuseppe D'Agata, the one constant in a line-up that has changed beyond recognition since Il Segno del Comando formed in 1995 is bassist Diego Banchero, who has impressive connections within the Genoa music scene. The current personnel remain unchanged since 2018’s L'Incanto Dello Zero. Joining Banchero were Davide Bruzzi (guitars, keyboards); Fernando Cherchi (drums); Roberto Lucanato (guitars); Beppi Menozzi (keyboards); and Riccardo Morello (vocals)


46 years since their self-titled debut Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, the BMS set mixed 70’s classics with highlights from 2019’s Transiberiana. Last year’s offering marked the first new album for 25 years, the last studio album 13 being released in 1994, and Vittorio Nocenzi made a conscious effort to produce something that captured the original Banco spirit, albeit with an updated sound and clean production. Along with Nocenzi (piano, keyboards and voice) who has been guiding Banco since it was founded were Filippo Marcheggiani (lead guitar), Nicola Di Gia (rhythm guitar), Marco Capozi (bass), Fabio Moresco (ex-Metamorfosi, drums), and Tony D'Alessio (lead vocal.) Unfortunately Gianni Nocenzi did not appear but that didn’t detract from the spectacle or quality of the evening’s music. I thought they were going to begin with Transiberiana opener Stelle Sulla Terra but that proved to be a tease, as the opening bars transformed into Metamorfosi then subsequently taking us through more of the eponymous debut LP, selections from Darwin!, Io Sono Nato Librero and Transiberiana. The music wasn’t the only entertainment – Nocenzi also tells a good story, affecting a cod-Genoese accent and attitude which had my (Genoese) friends laughing out loud, getting political (my sort of politics), and then disparaging the quality and content of the Sanremo music festivals. Each song was performed with consummate skill, the early pieces varying from the album versions due to the different conformations of the band over 40+ years and D’Alessio, who has a fine voice, not even considering the fruitless task of sounding like Francesco di Giacomo. Banco are right up there with the cream of progressive rock, not just progressivo italiano. At times you can hear hints of ELP in the organ and piano but they are so much more than an ELP-school group. More rocking than many of their original Italian contemporaries their social commentary was spot on in the 70s and remains so today. If you’ve not heard any Banco del Mutuo Soccorso you need to buy some of their albums; if you’ve not seen them play live, you should make every endeavour to do so. Is anyone up for hosting Banco in the UK?




Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Genoa 5/2/20
Banco del Mutuo Soccorso, Genoa 5/2/20

Big Big Train and The Passengers Club


The Passengers Club, a new forum for Big Big Train fans was launched on February 14th.

Membership of the Passengers Club gives listeners a chance to get behind the scenes in the world of Big Big Train. Club members will be able to hear early demos from the writing and recording stages of their studio releases and demos of songs that got lost along the way, including some tracks from an abandoned concept album that they were working on a few years ago. There will be films of the band backstage, recording in the studio, and during rehearsals and soundchecks. There will also be exclusive photo galleries, blog posts, Facebook Q & As, and other good things. Membership costs £30 for one year, or £50 for two years and full details of how to sign up, what is on offer, and the reasons for starting the Passengers Club can be found at https://thepassengersclub.com

By ProgBlog, Jan 8 2018 03:43PM

Not content with the excellent music I received at Christmas, Gentle Giant’s Three Piece Suite, David Gilmour Live at Pompeii and Änglagård’s Prog på Svenska - Live in Japan, I reviewed my wish list and found that Folklore by Big Big Train was unavailable on vinyl... I’ve come a bit late to the Big Big Train party, only possessing the material released on the cover mount CDs of Prog magazine and until recently, when my listening habits relaxed a little, not being sufficiently moved enough to buy any of their albums. The first track I heard was probably Winchester from St. Giles' Hill, a YouTube clip which one reviewer described as ‘the best song Peter Gabriel never sung.’ It’s a very pleasant piece of music but as it doesn’t pick up the pace until about 5 minutes in, I’m ashamed to say I didn’t pursue the output of the band until sorting out my music library last year and finding Last Train, Kingmaker and Judas Unrepentant, all of which I very much like, on Prognosis 5, Prognosis 18 and P5 Into the Lens respectively, prompting me to add Folklore to my wish list. With that album out of stock, I decided to order Grimspound (on vinyl) instead, even before Burning Shed had reopened after Christmas, just in case that too became unavailable as an LP. Depending on how much I like Grimspound, I might have to buy a download of Folklore until the vinyl edition gets re-released.


Christmas present - Three Piece Suite by Gentle Giant
Christmas present - Three Piece Suite by Gentle Giant

I’ve also visited the BTF website, after seeing the vinyl version of Dedicato a Frazz by Semiramis advertised in the sidebar of my weekly email from the Italian prog distributors and mail order firm. I’ve been after the LP since before seeing the band perform at last year’s Progressivamente festival in Rome because it’s a great piece of music, little known or appreciated outside of Italy until the renaissance of prog; the CD was one of my most expensive second-hand purchases on that particular format but I’ve always thought it was well worth it, like some obscure treasure.

It seemed pointless to splash out on postage for one album so I added DNA by Jumbo to my shopping cart. I currently own this as a download, having never seen the release in a physical format, despite always scouring the Js in the CD and record bins in every record shop I go to in Italy. The first of their two classic RPI albums, DNA represents fairly basic progressivo Italiano but it’s still quite enjoyable. There’s not a great deal of variation in the keyboard with only organ and piano but, in common with quite a lot of early Italian progressive rock, there’s a hefty dose of flute which sounds as though it’s been inspired by Ian Anderson and early King Crimson. DNA was Jumbo’s first foray into a progressive sound but there’s still a weighty reminder of their roots, including harmonica, a blues instrument which I don’t believe has any place in prog! However, the influence of early UK prog is evident throughout and Ed Ora Corri (And now you have to run), the second part of the 3-part composition that makes up side one of the original LP (Suite per il Sig K., a track that reflects a Kafka-like existence) is quite spacey and seems to have been at least partially inspired by Pink Floyd. I’ve owned their 1973 release Vietato al minora di 18 anni? (Prohibited to minors under 18?) for a year now, a limited edition from BTF on red vinyl and apart from seeing vocalist-guitarist-songwriter Alvaro Fella performing with Consorzio Acqua Potable (CAP) at the Riviera Prog festival in Genova in 2014, where at the time he was confined to a wheelchair, I have also seen Fella play with CAP, and Jumbo, at Progressivamente in Rome last September. On record, Fella’s vocals might seem something of an acquired taste – he has a distinctive theatrical style that has hints of Alex Harvey or Roger Chapman from Family, but his singing comes across as perfectly suited to the music when you witness him play live.


The first gig of the year was a fairly low-key affair at The Dublin Castle in Camden. I was accompanied by Jim Knipe who only got to see a fraction of the main attraction, Hats Off Gentlemen It’s Adequate, but had to sit through an excruciating performance by Unit 48 who were like Haircut 100 fronted by David Brent, one nondescript singer/guitarist, and a rather intriguing opening act False Plastic, a trio of bass, drums and guitar who played short, spiky numbers apart from their final song, where they let rip with some psychedelic punk.


The line-up at The Dublin Castle 4/1/18
The line-up at The Dublin Castle 4/1/18

I’d been invited to listen to the new release Broken but Still Standing by Hats Off Gentlemen It’s Adequate at the end of last year and found it a pretty good mixture of prog and post-rock. The soundscapes are quite Floydian (especially post-Waters Floyd) and the themes are pretty deep; if that isn’t enough to intrigue you, the flute is absolutely gorgeous and these passages are the most prog. Their album When the Kill Code Fails from 2016 comes with a recommendation from Steve Hackett.

I was included in a tweet sometime during the day of the gig that flautist Kathryn Thomas wouldn’t be appearing and that the band, which can involve as many as five people or as few as just one, would be appearing as a duo, Malcolm Galloway on guitar and vocals, and Mark Gatland on bass, keyboard and effects; I wasn’t put off by the pared-down outfit because I knew that some of the material could be recreated using patches and triggers and though we weren’t going to get the high quality prog of the first fifteen minutes of Broken but Still Standing, there were plenty of other parts of the latest album which were very enjoyable.


Broken but Still Standing by Hats Off Gentlemen It's Adequate
Broken but Still Standing by Hats Off Gentlemen It's Adequate

Indeed, the set was a mixture of the shorter material from Kill Code and Broken and it was thoroughly enjoyable. The programmed drumming, something I’m a bit wary of, sounded like an authentic kit and the washes and bits of electronica were quite like on the albums. There was one moment, possibly at the end of My Clockwork Heart where Galloway pressed the wrong foot pedal and guitar continued playing, even though it was the end of the song. Galloway’s vocal style is quite languid, a bit like Pete Shelley, but it does suit the music; this is in comparison to Gatland who was a ball of energy, leaping around the small stage sometimes two footed, bringing his knees up to his chest. It wasn’t only good to listen to, it was genuinely entertaining and when I spoke to them afterwards it was quite clear that they’re both really nice guys. I bought the two recent CDs and took advantage of the special merchandise stand offer – buy two get the third (Invisible) free. The duo made an appearance at HRH Prog last year as stand-ins for Touchstone and by all accounts, went down very well. It’s hardly surprising. Their originality, enthusiasm and great songs mark them out to be a group to watch. I can’t wait to see them as a five-piece.


Hats Off Gentlemen It's Adequate set list 4/1/18
Hats Off Gentlemen It's Adequate set list 4/1/18

Still driven to own more music, I visited Croydon’s 101 records for their half-price New Year sale, where the offers were only available to those who’ve signed up to Duncan Barnes’ email list. The condition of the album is rated as A (Very Good Condition) to C and though I’ve had numerous chances to pick up the original Journey to the Centre of the Earth for £1 from flea markets, I’ve always resisted because the sleeve and/or the LP has been badly marked. I’m please I waited. With a sale price of £2 and rated as in VGC, I bought Journey (a record I’ve never owned before) and a replacement The Myths and Legends of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table, something I bought in 1975 and sold in ’77 or ’78, also for £2. I then splashed out and added Ekseption's Greatest Hits for £3!


Sale bargains from Croydon's 101 Records
Sale bargains from Croydon's 101 Records

I’m not sure I’ll ever stop wanting more music...








By ProgBlog, May 7 2017 06:11PM

When my son was young we had family membership of both English Heritage and the National Trust and some part of most weekends was spent on outings to properties and gardens in the south east, with occasional forays into the north west when we returned to visit my family. Our subscriptions lapsed when Daryl became an adult; not only would this have incurred extra cost but we also saw less of him when he graduated and went off to do a Master’s degree in Oxford and then went to work in Australia for 18 months.

Remarkably for someone who graduated after the global economic meltdown, his career is based on his academic choices, architecture and historic conservation, and it’s this calling which has rekindled our interest in wandering around London in search of bits of fascinating architecture and design. When I first came to London in 1978 I roamed the streets from Notting Hill to Holborn looking for sites both off and on the tourist radar and, after almost weekly trips for three years, I considered myself well acquainted with the capital. This obsession with exploring the urban environment was an extension of my behaviour in Barrow, where almost all accessible and many (theoretically) inaccessible parts of the Furness peninsula were forensically investigated, inviting derision from anyone outside of a close circle of friends. Genetic or environmentally influenced, Daryl’s fixation with seeking out architectural gems means his knowledge of London’s streets is far better than mine ever was.

On a recent trip to the Design Museum in Kensington, a must for lovers of modernist architecture or anyone with a curiosity about the history of design, we stopped off at Café Phillies for a coffee and some lunch. I was intrigued to see a minibus pull up outside, the London Rock Legends Tour, on a stop to visit Bill Wyman’s Sticky Fingers restaurant which is opposite Café Phillies in Phillimore Road. I’m sure there are plenty of music-related sights, from the Abbey Road zebra crossing in St John’s Wood to The Hendrix/Handel museum in Brook Street, Mayfair, but it can’t be easy planning a sightseeing tour in London by road; the roadworks and sheer volume of traffic are hardly conducive to a strict schedule.



Inside the Design Museum
Inside the Design Museum

I was amazed to see the Yes logo on the side of the bus, along with more rock ‘n’ roll acts but, as the itinerary takes in pubs and clubs, it could be that there’s a stop at what used to be La Chasse at 100 Wardour Street, just down from the old Marquee. Writing songs about a particular location is nothing out of the ordinary but it tends to be a bit of a rarity in progressive rock; The King Crimson improvisations given the title of the town or city where they were recorded don’t count, whereas Egg’s A Visit to Newport Hospital (on the Isle of Wight) from The Polite Force (1971) is an excellent example – at this point it’s pertinent to mention that former Egg drummer and Pink Floyd drum tech Clive Brooks died last week, another loss to the progressive community.

I decided to challenge myself and go through my collection in search of London-themed compositions, requiring lyrics about the place, to see if it was possible to put together a virtual tour of physical locations, streets or landmarks which warranted a mention somewhere in the prog catalogue.

Public transport may have its problems but a combination of rail, tube and foot is by far the best way to move around the city and coincidentally, the tube map turns out to be a good place to start looking. Crimson’s Doctor Diamond from the Red-era, a song that never managed to get a studio release, doesn’t mention a place despite the reference to an ‘underground train’. I’d always assumed it was a New York subway train because Fallen Angel from the same cohort of songs is set in New York, but there’s every possibility that it’s London Underground, with a capital ‘U’. The most comprehensive reference to London Underground is on Alight, released earlier this year by progressivo Italiano Cellar Noise, where apart from the track Underground Ride, other songs are named after District and Circle Line stations Embankment, Temple, Blackfriars and Monument. This remarkable debut effort is a concept album where the narrative takes place somewhere between the real world and the imagination of the protagonist who, stuck in the monotonous grind of the daily commute through the underbelly of London, who suddenly finds a reason for existence. Musically and lyrically there are parallels with Genesis, from the Trespass-era to The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway (another New York-themed album) and the opening track on the album, Dive with Me is stylistically and harmonically linked to Foxtrot. It comes as no surprise that the play The Knife at gigs as an encore.



Genesis name-checked Epping Forest on Selling England by the Pound, a remnant of ancient woodland straddling the Greater London-Essex border where Peter Gabriel set his fictitious skirmish between rival East End gangs, apparently inspired by a piece in a newspaper that he’d read some years earlier. As much as I like this track, the piece has so much going on that when you include the four-minute instrumental After the Ordeal, it feels as though it’s taken up the entire side of the record when you’ve still got the ten-minute Cinema Show to come! Epping Forest is served by a number of stops on the Central Line and Forest Road, lined with its luxury cars (according to the song) heads into the forest from Loughton.

Also on the London Underground network is Turnham Green, served by the District and Piccadilly lines. This appears in Suite in C from McDonald and Giles’ self-titled album released in 1970, as a sub-section of the 11’40 mini-epic. This is a love song dedicated to Charlotte Bates, where the Turnham Green lyrics refer to the first time McDonald set eyes on Bates and the tube station where she disembarked. Besotted, McDonald placed an advert in International Times and remarkably, this was spotted by Bates’ friend who had been on the tube with her. It’s not really like Crimson but Michael Giles’ jazzy drum patterns do call to mind his work with his former band and his brother’s bass wouldn’t have been out of place on anything by the Crims; the subject matter is quite different, giving a more Beatles-like feel to the track.



Perhaps there’s a link between London geography and songs by King Crimson alumni. The UK song Nevermore, from their first album is about Soho, though it doesn’t relate to one particular location. Lyrically, it appears to be thematically linked to In the Dead of Night; commencing with some beautiful Allan Holdsworth acoustic guitar, it’s an altogether underrated piece with changes of dynamics and an experimental middle section. If Nevermore is a little hazy in its precise location, Rendezvous 6:02 from subsequent UK album Danger Money describes both time and place. When I first arrived in London I used to use the Sidcup branch of the railway from Charing Cross to Dartford, because my hall of residence was in North Cray, between Sidcup and Bexley. Stopping at Waterloo East, this journey afforded an excellent view of the (now Grade II Listed) Victory Arch leading into the main Waterloo Station. Built from Portland stone and completed in 1922, I find it an ugly piece of architecture but it relates to one of the most memorable UK songs, the poignant Rendezvous 6:02, which first describes the car journey from Hyde Park to Waterloo before specifically mentioning the arch itself. It was always a favourite pastime reviewing the departures timetable for trains leaving at two minutes past six in the evening and the last time I attended a talk at the nearby BFI, I deliberately arranged to meet Daryl at 18:02 under the arch.

It may not be part of the Underground network but Bill Bruford wrote the tune Palewell Park for the last of the Bruford albums. I’m labouring the point here, but this location, like the somewhat lengthier (in terms of both track timing and ground dimensions) Hergest Ridge was to Mike Oldfield, was evidently very inspiring to Bruford who lived close by in East Sheen and it's surprising because it's a piano-bass duet!.



Ian Anderson dedicated almost a full side to Baker Street on Minstrel in the Gallery, and Fulham Road features in A Passion Play. Of the former, which also mentions Blandford Street and Marylebone Road, this is the district inhabited by Anderson during 1974, making observations of everyday life in London W1. It’s possible that some of the lyrical content reflects some of the rehearsals for the album, where Anderson took on a great deal of the work as his fellow band members entertained themselves around Monte Carlo; there’s certainly more of a singer-songwriter feel to parts of the album, more acoustic guitar and less flute, but it remains one of the high points of the Jethro Tull canon. I’m less convinced about A Passion Play, particularly the use of saxophone and synthesizer, although the storyline is rather good. Is Fulham Road referenced because Brompton cemetery is close by?



Returning to modern prog, Big Big Train recite the names of underground and former waterways in Lost Rivers of London, from 2016’s Folklore. Citing Old Kent Road and Turnagain Lane (off Farringdon Road), there is much to be admired in their approach which reconnects modern, melodic prog with the importance of the roots of the genre. With the Fleet, the Tyburn, the Neckinger, the Westbourne, the Walbrook and the Effra, there are plenty of places to put on a progressive rock map of London.

...and there are a number of mews around Baker Street!







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