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ProgBlog goes to the Biennale Architettura 2018 in Venice but still manages to find prog connections - and a relatively new record store...

By ProgBlog, May 14 2017 06:07PM

Gig review by Mike Chavez


Despite being aware of Steve Hackett since the early 80s it’s taken until now to finally get to see him, and it was hearing the thoroughly excellent Genesis Revisited II last year that swung it for me to get tickets this time. The tickets were bought a good six months ago, and despite getting in very early a huge block of seats near the front was immediately taken, leading me to think that the resellers and touts were seeing this as some kind of beano. So middle of row Z it was then, accompanied by my gig buddies Mike and Lois. Happily the Colston is quite forgiving if you don’t have the best seats, and the sound was excellent too.


The show was billed as Genesis Revisited with Classic Hackett, and there were heavy intimations beforehand about likely plundering of Genesis’ Wind & Wuthering album on its 40th anniversary. In a show of two halves we started with Classic Hackett, including three tracks from the very well received new album The Night Siren, plus half a dozen others including Serpentine Song and the set closer Shadow of the Hierophant.

Despite being not particularly au fait with the music being played I enjoyed it immensely as the material was good and the musicianship excellent. Music played by players at the top of their game is seldom going to be disappointing. The typical guitar, bass, keyboards, drums line up I was expecting was augmented by Rob Townsend on a variety of instruments including flute, percussion and sax. I know now that Rob is a regular on Hackett tours, and he really does add an extra dimension to the music, as well as bringing some interesting jazz and eastern influences. Regular Hackett performers Gary O’Toole (drums) and Roger King (keyboards) were joined by the mighty Nick Beggs on bass and a variety of guitars, presumably killing time between Steven Wilson tours and the myriad of other things he gets up to. Hackett himself was looking very good for his years, and was content to allow the others their chances to shine. Buttering up the crowd he told us how beautiful a place Bristol was…and that he wished he could afford to live here! Come on Steve, the times aren’t that tough mate, even you could probably get a three bed semi in Knowle West.


After the break we got the Genesis Revisited work, which did draw heavily from Wind & Wuthering as predicted. Vocalist Nad Sylvan joined the band for set two, resplendent in a garish long coat that would not have looked out of place on an 18th century fop. We got most of Wind & Wuthering, including One for The Vine, Eleventh Earl of Mar and Afterglow, and the excellent Inside and Out, which was left off the album and included on the Spot the Pigeon EP, a hit single back in 1977. Hackett swapped out a few Tony Banks keyboard lines for his own guitar lines here and there, but then it was his show after all. One of the highlights for me was drummer Gary O’Toole singing Blood on the Rooftops, which he made a great job of, in fact I much prefer his vocal to that of Phil Collins. I would have said it was unusual to hear a drummer do the vocals, but then you can’t really say that about a Genesis track…

The rest of the show was not too dissimilar to the Seconds Out live album, Hackett’s Genesis swansong where his guitar was allegedly mixed down after his announcement to quit: Firth of Fifth (but with the beautiful piano intro restored), Cinema Show, Dance on a Volcano and Musical Box thrilled the crowd, with Slogans (from Defector) and Los Endos as the encore to close a set lasting just shy of 2 ½ hours, and receiving a standing ovation from the audience.


The chroniclers often tell us there are two versions of Genesis, the Gabriel led prog legends and the Collins led pop band. That doesn’t nearly tell the whole story, and it certainly didn’t all change or turn to rats when Gabriel quit the band, in fact both A Trick of the Tail and Wind & Wuthering are great Genesis albums in my opinion. The turning point for me was Steve Hackett leaving, so perhaps the Hackett years and the Collins years is a more appropriate way to segment the band’s career. No offence Anthony Phillips!

I had pretty high expectations for this show, I wasn’t disappointed. I’m just wondering why I waited 35 years to go and see him live.


If you’re quick there are still four UK dates left, with the final one in London on Friday 19th


Full set list:


Set 1 (Classic Hackett):

1. Every Day

2. El Niño

3. The Steppes

4. In the Skeleton Gallery

5. Behind the Smoke

6. Serpentine Song

7. Rise Again

8. Shadow of the Hierophant


Set 2 (Genesis Revisited with Nad Sylvan):

9. Eleventh Earl of Mar

10. One for the Vine

11. Blood on the Rooftops

12. ...In That Quiet Earth

13. Afterglow

14. Dance on a Volcano

15. Inside and Out

16. Firth of Fifth

17. The Musical Box


Encore:

18. Slogans

19. Los Endos



By ProgBlog, Dec 27 2015 11:05PM

I was very fortunate to receive a good collection of prog this Christmas. I try to help family members with a wish list but even better, my wife, who has a history of buying prog for my birthdays and Christmases, gets progressive rock-related suggestions from Amazon. One present I wasn’t expecting was the Steve Hackett: The Man, The Music DVD (Wienerworld, 2015) which is an up-to-date documentary that includes material relating to Wolflight and ends with a dedication to Chris Squire who was interviewed for the release. It also boasts a design that dovetails with that for Hackett’s Genesis Revisited: Live at Hammersmith box set (InsideOut Music, 2013.) Filmed and directed by Matt Groom it includes some insights into the early Hackett family life but the parts that will be of most interest to fans are those that relate to the Genesis period and the subsequent solo (Hackett band) material. The man himself comes across as very thoughtful and very polite when he comes to discuss his former colleagues in Genesis. It may be that those interviews were conducted before the shoddy treatment he received at the hands of the Genesis: Together and Apart documentary aired in October 2014. Keyboard player Roger King features quite heavily because of the value of his long-term musical and production contributions and there are other cameos from brother John Hackett, drummer Gary O’Toole, wind player Rob Townsend, guitarist Amanda Lehmann and inimitable bassist Nick Beggs. There are also discussions between Hackett and Steven Wilson and Hackett and Chris Squire. Footage from a concert at Leamington Spa is very well recorded and it would be interesting to know if there was sufficient material from that gig for a full DVD release.

I was listening to Nursery Cryme (1971) on my commute to and from work one day last week and was surprised to hear For Absent Friends, thinking that I’d not included it when I transferred the album to my mp3 player. Described by Hackett in the DVD as one of his first contributions to the group, I find the song a little throwaway. Hackett confirmed what I’ve always suspected, that Phil Collins featured on vocals on this track though when I won tickets from Capital Radio to see Genesis for their Three Sides Live Tour, the question was “what is the Genesis track where Phil Collins first sings solo?” I answered, on a homemade postcard, More Fool Me from Selling England by the Pound (1973) which has the sleeve declaration “(Vocals Phil)”. As I put the postcard in the post box I did wonder if it was a trick question so getting the ‘congratulations!’ letter came as a total surprise. Overall, The Man, The Music is a well balanced piece of work covering all of Hackett’s output, his personal thoughts, his guitar technique and with some interesting input from collaborators and family. I’d recommend it for any Hackett fan.



Congratulations letter from Capital Radio
Congratulations letter from Capital Radio

My wife also got me David Bedford’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1975), a CD that had been on my wish list for some time. I bought a copy of Bedford’s Star Clusters, Nebulae & Places in Devon / The Song of the White Horse (1983) on vinyl from a record fair earlier this year which I really like, having previously dug out a YouTube video of the fascinating Omnibus documentary about the commission and making of White Horse. I bought a copy of Höstsonaten’s live performance of The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (2013) from Fabio Zuffanti’s stall at the Prog Résiste festival in 2014, which included a DVD of the show from December 2012. That release epitomises Italian progressive rock with its brilliant musicianship and operatic scope and it rekindled my admiration for Coleridge’s poetry; when I was an undergraduate I used to own a copy of Coleridge’s complete works that I lent to an English student who never returned the book. I thought that the David Bedford version, from over 35 years earlier and narrated by actor Robert Powell, would make an interesting comparison. White Horse is truly organic, utilising the blowing stone in the instrumentation and describing a landscape; comparisons with Mike Oldfield’s sublime Bedford-orchestrated Hergest Ridge (1974) seem quite appropriate, whereas I find Ancient Mariner closer in structure to The Odyssey (1976) with less reliance on atonality and dissonance and more on recognisable melody, created with multiple keyboard lines. Having said that, there’s a highly evocative sparse percussive section where the ship is ice bound and it sounds like lanterns and sundry deck equipment is moving in the wind.

It’s interesting that Powell’s narration isn’t a recital of the poem; rather it conforms to what Bedford set out in the sleeve notes for the album, wanting to evoke the mood and atmosphere of certain passages, an effect achieved by using the notes from the margin of the poem. One of these, “No twilight within the courts of the sun” became a track by Steven Wilson on his first full-length solo album Insurgents (2008). I really like Ancient Mariner.

Another present that I’d not accessed before is Beyond and Before - the formative years of Yes by Peter Banks with Billy James (Golden Treasures Publishing, 2001.) Banks (born Brockbanks) died in 2013 and appeared on the first two Yes albums before forming his own band Flash. His style of playing was unique and he’s remembered as being a better guitarist than he was originally regarded. Flash weren’t really prog so I didn’t follow them particularly closely though it was hard to miss their albums in record stores. Banks himself has not really featured in much of the general discussion of the genre despite his excellent guitar work with Yes so this publication can be regarded as going some way to correct that omission. The book suffers from repetition, an excess of exclamations and some poor grammar but it’s gratifying to see very little bitterness in someone who wasn’t necessarily treated as well as they deserved; there aren’t many people he doesn’t like. He reflects upon material on which he performed and though he may have not been pleased with the recorded results at the time, he reassesses the music and generally now appreciates how it has turned out. It may not be deeply analytical but it’s easy and pleasurable to read.



Beyond and Before
Beyond and Before

Cactus Choir (1976) by Dave Greenslade is another album I’ve had on my radar for some time. Recorded not long after the break-up of Greenslade, the production is much cleaner than his previous band efforts but overall it’s less proggy and more bluesy and, in my opinion, less clever. I really liked the dynamic between Dave Greenslade and Dave Lawson and I liked Lawson’s lyrics. Early Greenslade may have sounded a little raw but there seemed to be a very good understanding between the four members. Simon Phillips isn’t a bad replacement for Andrew McCulloch and Tony Reeves features on half the tracks but the vocals are disappointing, with Steve Gould sounding like Elton John on the title track. For me, only Finale reaches the standard of the old band but it’s by no means a terrible effort.

With a remastered copy of GTR (2015), another Steve Hackett connection, Solaris’ Martian Chronicles II (2014) and, from my brother Richard Progeny: Seven Shows from Seventy Two this has been a good Christmas. I really appreciate all my other presents but the prog-related gifts have been exceptional.




Christmas presents
Christmas presents




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