ProgBlog

By ProgBlog, Jun 23 2020 09:27PM


The ProgBlog Diary

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world


Like in April’s diary, all May additions to the ProgBlog collection were ordered online using Bandcamp and Burning Shed because of the continuing lockdown and the classification of (physical) record shops as non-essential. However, the UK government, wisely or otherwise allowed ‘non-essential’ shops to open from Monday 15th June and at the end of that week I donned a bespoke face mask and took the short tram journey to Beckenham’s Wanted Records. The list of purchases therefore spans May and half of June and reflects that I am not only trying to kick start the local economy but also attempting to do my bit to preserve small, grass-roots venues (see https://joquail.bandcamp.com/album/the-parodos-cairn): Il Velo del Riflessi (vinyl) - Quel che disse il Tuono; Music of Our Times (CD) – Gary Husband & Markus Reuter; Cambrium–Music for Protozoa (CD) – Stephen Parsick; From Within (v) – Anekdoten; Gravity (v) – Anekdoten; The Rome Pro(g)ject I (v) - The Rome Pro(g)ject; ~ (download) – Iamthemorning; The Experience (v) – Laviàntica; Clessidra (CD) – Laviàntica; Il Paese del Tramonto (CD) - Unreal City; The Parodos Cairn (d) - Jo Quail; The Lights in the Aisle Will Guide You (v) – Hooffoot; Zopp (CD) – Zopp; Until They Feel the Sun (CD) – Moon Letters; The ReconstruKction of Light (v) – King Crimson; Instructions for Angels (v) – David Bedford; Stationary Traveller (v) – Camel; Sunbirds (v) – Sunbirds; USA 40th anniversary edition, v) – King Crimson



Coming up

There’s still no date for the UK entertainment industry to reopen but Italy is ready. The 2020 Porto Antico Prog Fest, featuring progressivo Italiano legends Balletto di Bronzo, supported by local Genoa bands Il Segno del Comando and Jus Primae Noctis, will take place on Saturday 11th July from 7pm at the Piazza delle Feste, Genoa








By ProgBlog, May 5 2020 09:26PM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world


Recent additions


All April additions to the ProgBlog collection were ordered online using Bandcamp and Burning Shed because of the continuing lockdown and the classification of (physical) record shops as non-essential; my pre-order of Jon Kirkman’s latest book, Tales from Photographic Oceans Giants Under the Sun, pre-ordered at the end of last year also arrived to brighten up a weekend.

I’ve attempted to keep the economy ticking over but it’s another short list thanks to the constraints imposed to reduce the spread of Covid-19: Oughtibridge (Download) – [‘ramp]; The Equatorial Stars (Vinyl) – Fripp & Eno; Todmorden 513 (CD) – Markus Reuter; Tales from Photographic Oceans (Book) – Jon Kirkman; No Sleep ‘til Wilmersdorf (CD) – [‘ramp]; Frammenti Notturni (V) – Unreal City; Nostalgia for Infinity (CD) – Hats Off Gentlemen It’s Adequate; Debris (CD) – [‘ramp]


The recent past


Book review: Tales from Photographic Oceans Giants Under the Sun - Jon Kirkman



Jon Kirkman's limited edition Tales From Photographic Oceans Giants Under the Sun was published in April, a photodocumentary of Yes live performances from 1969 - 2019 using previously unseen images primarily supplied by fans, many of which are of professional quality. There’s an introductory piece ‘The Camera on the Cover’ by Tony Howard, a former Southampton denizen who now lives in Canada; it’s his Olympus OM10 on the cover, used for photos of solo shows by Jon Anderson and Rick Wakeman in 1980 and of Yes during the Drama tour that feature in the book. He relates how he had to hide his camera at the venue and how it was taken away from him part way through that Drama show, which chimes with my experience of attempting to take my Olympus OM2N into a Yes gig, having it removed at the bag search before the show then returned to me afterwards (I can only think that this was the 90125 tour at Wembley because I managed to get surreptitious photos of Peter Hammill and Camel at around that time.)

Broadcaster, author, journalist and Cruise to the Edge co-host Kirkman got into Yes music in 1972 through And You and I from Close to the Edge being shown on the UK's staple rock music TV programme The Old Grey Whistle Test, then hearing debut album Yes via the son of a friend of his mother, and being a Liverpudlian, connecting with the cover of The Beatles Every Little Thing. He’s since built up a close working relationship and friendships with the band, interviewing 16 of the 18 members for his books Yes - Time and a Word: The Yes Interviews (2013) and its updated version Dialogue (2017) making him ideally suited to curate such a project. It’s therefore not surprising he first photo is of Peter Banks in 1969, in black and white, captured in mid air holding a blonde Telecaster above his head. It’s striking not only because it’s a well-composed image but because it’s not the white Rickenbacker everyone associates with Banks during his time in Yes.

Each group of photos is accompanied by the show’s set list and a photo of the ticket stub, and given the difficulties of clandestine photography in theatres during the pre-digital era, it’s not surprising that there’s better coverage of the band from this millennium.

This book isn’t for everyone. For a start it’s a limited print run of 300, which makes it quite expensive, but for the hard-core fan it’s a really good addition to the library of Yes biographies, despite the paucity of words. And though there’s not going to be a second print run, there is a possibly of a second edition because of the overwhelming number of photos submitted. I’ll be signing up for that, too.


Details of how to order Jon Kirkman’s Tales From Photographic Oceans Giants Under the Sun can be found on his website: https://jonkirkman.co.uk/product/tales-from-photographic-oceans/



More Covid-19 cancellation chaos


Stewart / Gaskin Kings Place Concert Rescheduled

Dave Stewart and Barbara Gaskin have announced that their forthcoming performance at Kings Place, London has been put back a year to Saturday July 31st 2021 when it’s hoped that some semblance of normal life has returned. Everyone who bought a ticket for August 1st 2020 will be able to use their e-ticket for the rescheduled date at no extra cost: if you haven't done so already, please print it and keep it safe till next summer. Alternatively, you can get a full refund by emailing [email protected] with the subject line 'Stewart/Gaskin ticket refund'. There will be an announcement when tickets for the rescheduled concert go on sale, but Stewart and Gaskin are assuring those who already have an e-ticket will have their seat guaranteed


Yes - The Album Series European Tour 2020





It’s just been announced that Yes have postponed the European and UK legs of the 2020 tour and are working on confirmed dates for the rescheduled shows. The Royal Albert Hall (where I’ve booked tickets) is due to provide updated information on its website on May 31st. According to the Yes (official) Facebook page, all tickets bought for this year’s performances will be valid for the new shows


Rick Wakeman – The Red Planet



If the YouTube clips are anything to go by, Rick Wakeman’s The Red Planet, originally intended for release on April 3rd along with special launch events, will be well worth waiting for. It’s been held up by manufacturing and logistical issues caused by the Covid-19 pandemic and the latest update suggests it’s going to be closer to June when we can finally get our hands on what sounds like the proggiest project Wakeman has been responsible for since debut solo album The Six Wives of Henry VIII (the last notification from Music Glue gives the date as May 22nd.)


By ProgBlog, Apr 1 2020 08:51PM

A list of recent past, present and future happenings in the prog world



ProgBlog's March acquisitions
ProgBlog's March acquisitions

March additions to the ProgBlog collection, a short list due to constraints imposed to reduce the spread of Covid-19: Garofano Rosso (Vinyl) – Banco del Mutuo Soccorso; Broadcasting from Europa 1 (bootleg) (V) – Pink Floyd; Beaubourg (V) - Vangelis; Star’s End (V) – David Bedford; Casino (V) – Al Dimeola; The Universal Play (V) – Gandalf; Time & Tide (V) – Greenslade; No Smoke Without Fire (V) – Wishbone Ash; Worlds Within (V) – Raphael Weinroth-Browne; The Stone House (Download) – Wingfield Reuter Stavi Sirkis; 20180311 Sono Centrum, Brno (D) – Stick Men; Kopfmensche – Markus Reuter (D); From A Page/In the Present (Live from Lyon) (V+CD) – Yes; Angel’s Egg (V) – Gong; Frozen Radios (D) – [‘ramp]


The recent past


Live report: Lifesigns, The Half Moon, Putney, March 11th


I’m a recent convert to Lifesigns, having re-appraised my original opinion from 2013 or 2014 and really enjoyed their performance at Trading Boundaries last summer. With a few more listens under my belt, I thought the Half Moon gig was better and I put this down to greater familiarity with their material. As much as I liked Trading Boundaries as a venue, I’m not convinced that a post-prandial concert setting is the most conducive for a good atmosphere – those of us who didn’t eat had to stand where we could while waiting staff moved in and out; at the Half Moon there wasn’t too much to-and-froing between the bar and where I was standing. In fact my chosen position afforded an excellent view of three quarters of the band, with only Frosty Beedle obscured behind his drum kit.


Lifesigns at the Half Moon, Putney 11-03-2020
Lifesigns at the Half Moon, Putney 11-03-2020

What was more obvious to me this time was the band’s dual persona: the exceptionally proggy bits (Jon Poole’s excellent bass work at times reminded me of Chris Squire’s approach, and apart from being a very good keyboard player, John Young revealed an exceptionally discerning taste in music on My Prog Five hosted by The Prog Report on YouTube); and the more pop-centric songs like Imagine. That Lifesigns can do pop shouldn’t come as any surprise given the pedigree of the musicians but Imagine, where the Lifesigns trademark vocal harmonies combine with an uplifting melody, could quite easily become a hit single if the right DJs heard it. I played the Imagine video to my wife, who is not a fan of prog, knowing that she’d like it. When I first heard it last year there were sections that reminded me of The Beatles; the first band that comes to mind now is Take That! I don’t mean to put-off diehard prog fans, because they’re a really great live act and most of the music occupies classic prog territory, even when they combine extended workouts with more accessible sections, like on At the End of the World. There was more than one moment during the gig that I was reminded of Yes’ stretched-out sections, not least because of Dave Bainbridge who at times employs a style not unlike Steve Howe. I’m really impressed by Bainbridge, who also plays gorgeous fluid guitar that calls to mind Allan Holdsworth.

This short UK tour included more material from the upcoming album than last year, with Gregarious a recent addition to the set, though favourites from the first album and Cardington were featured. Young has suggested that it’s getting more and more difficult to choose which songs to play, but I’m pleased that that Lighthouse, Cardington and N got an airing.

Considering that concern was growing over the spread of the novel coronavirus Covid-19, the gig was well attended and was very well received by all present


Lifesigns, Half Moon Putney 11-03-2020
Lifesigns, Half Moon Putney 11-03-2020

Covid-19 gig cancellation chaos


The North American leg of the Big Big Train 2020 tour has been cancelled, but the European dates for July are currently still scheduled


HRH Prog 9, scheduled for mid-March but postponed, has now been combined with HRH Prog 10 and rescheduled for October 17th and 18th at the Shepherds Bush Empire, London and the O2 Academy, Sheffield. Tickets and accommodation bookings have been transferred so those who had booked for the March event don’t have to do anything




Van der Graaf Generator have postponed their 2020 European tour. The London show is now scheduled to take place on November 19th. Details can be found here:

http://www.vandergraafgenerator.co.uk/#gigs


The Watch have postponed gigs on their A Prog Journey 1970/1976 tour. They were due to play in the UK in early April, including a show at Trading Boundaries on the 11th. Live music at Trading Boundaries has been suspended until at least the end of May


Available now or soon


Remastered (Download) by Astroligator, versions with and without lyrics (prog metal) – available now via Spotify


Fifth Dimension by Scarlet Moon (prog metal) will be available everywhere(!) from 3/4/20 – see http://scarletmoonmusic.com/ for details


Dante’s Inferno (EP) by Flight of Eden (prog metal) – available 9/4/20 via Bandcamp


All My Yesterdays (book) by Steve Howe will be published on 16th April and is available to pre-order from Burning Shed



Nostalgia for Infinity (CD) by Hats Off Gentlemen it’s Adequate (prog/alt-rock) – available 6/5/20 via Bandcamp









By ProgBlog, Jun 18 2018 03:41PM

In addition to progressive rock, I harbour an interest in architecture and last Saturday I signed up to a London Society lecture by Urban Design academic Dr Jane Clossick ‘The Plan for London and the Concrete Better World’ at London Metropolitan University. Highlighting her talk with pertinent case studies to explore themes of civic, economic, social and architectural change, she began with Abercrombie’s Plan for London (1943-44) which represented a shift from cities simply growing around people to the modernist notion that man was able to plan the city using the view from above, with pedestrians and vehicles spatially separated and distinct zones for industry, commerce and housing, with the housing soaring above the smog of the city. Her enthusiasm for this unique phase in the history of the capital’s architecture and how it has left its indelible print on the urban grain of the city was not a straightforward paean to concrete because she was dismissive of some of the social housing schemes, citing the deliberate design of spaces which had not historically featured in neighbourhoods and how these became the focal points for antisocial behaviour; what she did admire was the idea of the Southbank which facilitated access to high culture for all social strata.



I’ve previously blogged about the mistaken idea that progressive rock was elitist, personally believing that efforts to bridge high culture with popular culture coincided with a flourishing of civic architecture in concrete and that a wave of expansion of higher education institutions, often featuring iconic buildings in concrete, created a particular zeitgeist that allowed prog to develop. I found myself surrounded by the former-imprinted concrete of the Southbank again last week, to hear the BBC Concert Orchestra conducted by Michael Seal performing pieces for David Bedford at 80 at the Queen Elizabeth Hall. Bedford died from lung cancer aged 74, in October 2011; he would have been 80 this August.



Bedford was one of the foremost proponents of providing universal access to high culture, whether through his best known work, orchestrating Mike Oldfield’s Tubular Bells and his time as arranger and keyboard player for Kevin Ayres’ The Whole World or with his approach to composition; charts using pictures, rather than staves and notes and advocacy for unusual instrumentation, employing balloons, kazoos and even suggesting at one time that cans of dog biscuits were just as good as maracas.

One of the pieces last Tuesday was Orchestral Tubular Bells, marking a return to the Queen Elizabeth Hall for Bedford with Oldfield’s music; Bedford played keyboards for an ensemble created to promote Tubular Bells in the Hall a month after it had been released in 1973, alongside Oldfield and a cast of musicians associated with Virgin Records, including John Greaves and Fred Frith of Henry Cow and Steve Hillage from Gong.


My interest in the work of Bedford was first sparked by Oldfield’s 1974 sophomore release Hergest Ridge when I bought it in 1975. It remains my favourite Oldfield album, largely because it seems to have been influenced by the style of Romantic composers, its development and execution aided by supplementary musicians playing instruments associated with classical orchestras. Around this time I’d have also picked up the sleeve of Star’s End (1974) and later Instructions for Angels (1977) while browsing in record stores, though I never bought either record. In my opinion, developed over the last 45 years, Bedford’s scoring and arrangement for Camel’s Music Inspired by The Snow Goose (1975) is the best example of seamless blending of rock group and orchestra but it was The Song of the White Horse, a piece originally commissioned for BBC TV’s Omnibus and aired in 1978 which most made me appreciate his music. The programme showed Bedford in the process of writing, rehearsing and recording the score as well as performing it, interspersed with footage of him riding his motorcycle along the route of the Ridgeway to the White Horse at Uffington, his inspiration for the commission. He utilised a small ensemble with brass and strings, borrowed Soft Machine’s Mike Ratledge to help out on keyboards, and used the hand-picked female Queen’s College choir from his place of work and even employed another avant garde innovation, helium gas to increase the pitch of Diana Coulson’s vocals by around two octaves (speed of sound in air = 331 m/s; speed of sound in helium = 972 m/s) as the piece reached a climax of the libretto, GK Chesterton’s poem The Ballad of the White Horse celebrating King Alfred's victory over the Danes at the Battle of Englefield in 870.

The White Horse dates from around the Bronze Age, created by carving trenches into the hillside which were filled with crushed chalk. Part of a wider ancient landscape which includes the Blowing Stone, a perforated sarsen stone used in Bedford’s composition, the horse can be seen from miles away, as though leaping across the head of a dramatic, dry valley. One of my friends from university may have bought the Instructions for Angels LP in lieu of The Song of the White Horse, because the latter wasn’t available until 1983. It wasn’t until much later that I started to collect Bedford’s music; first a 1977 live recording of The Odyssey on CD which is a relatively formal rock piece, then Star Clusters, Nebulae & Places in Devon/The Song of the White Horse (1983) located at a second-hand vinyl fair in Brighton, and then The Rime of the Ancient Mariner (1975), first on CD and subsequently on vinyl from a Brighton flea market.


Seduced by the promise of a performance of The Orchestral Tubular Bells though quite happy to experience any of Bedford’s music I’d not heard, I signed up to the concert well over a year ago; it was only later that I learned that we’d also be treated to Alleluia timpanis, Symphony No.1, and a guest composition, the world premiere of A Little Bit of Everything by Robin Rimbaud aka Scanner.

Alleluia timpanis was commissioned for the King’s Lynn Festival in 1976 and incorporates the medieval Alleluia psallat theme, a joyous, uplifting refrain that interrupts, and contrasts with an ominous four-note descending line that is varied, developed and inverted throughout the piece, which forms the finale of Instructions for Angels. It was a rather good introduction to the evening.


Programme notes written by Bedford’s daughter Tammy explain why Scanner’s work was included that evening; any celebration of his work had to include an acknowledgement of his support for fellow composers throughout his life, so commissioning someone whose compositional style was different from her father’s but who would be inspired by Bedford’s work, fitted in neatly with the idea of his 80th anniversary. Tammy Bedford had known Scanner since 2002 and was aware of his works created in response to other musicians, but also that he respected her father’s work, so he was invited to write a piece for the concert. Interviewed just before the composition was premiered, Scanner explained that A Little Bit of Everything wasn’t a cover version or arrangement of Bedford’s music, but used phrases from the works, much like Bedford himself had borrowed from other texts such as the Worcester Fragments in Alleluia timpanis, and presenting a form of time travel, highlighting the exploratory nature of Bedford’s compositions and combining the orchestra with live electronics played by Scanner himself, closing with synthesizers in a nod to Bedford’s use of the instrument in the mid 70s. The stage was mostly cleared for this piece, leaving only a small chamber orchestra with Scanner towards the edge of the platform on the left. In good Bedford tradition, the music brought the best out of the players, sounding fairly challenging though ultimately very satisfying. The one drawback was that from my seat, the electronics were a little under-mixed.


When I first took my seat and saw the musicians appear I was a little surprised that a conventional orchestra was being used for a celebration of David Bedford; it was less surprising to see multi-instrumentalist, composer, instrument designer and Stick Men guitarist Markus Reuter, whose compositions share some traits with Bedford’s, sitting in the row behind. For those who like their avant-garde, there had been a performance of Bedford’s Balloon Music 1 in the foyer using members of the public before the concert proper but Symphony No. 1 (1984) conforms to a more traditional compositional style than the works associated with his atonal avant-garde output and rock (specifically crossover prog), employing a strongly melodic, tonal approach. Sitting in the third row was the first time I’d been close enough to an orchestra to relate to the instrumentation with a clear view of the ensemble slightly raised above the floor of the auditorium. The BBC Concert Orchestra is not the biggest, with around 60 members on stage, but I found that being able to discern its organisation was helpful in discriminating how the piece had been scored, how the overall composition fitted together, and even how Bedford had so successfully blended Camel’s melodic progressive rock with (an unnamed) orchestra which I now see has his stamp all over it.



Orchestras have changed very little in composition during the course of the 20th century, having expanded in the 18th and 19th centuries, the size and make-up dictated by the writing of prominent composers of the time who were in turn largely influenced by the possibilities of the instruments available to them. The clarinet was not invented until around the turn of the 18th century, so it doesn’t appear in accurate renditions of Baroque music and valves for brass instruments were not invented until the early 19th century, at which point there was a rapid growth in both the number and the prominence of trumpets and horns, coinciding with the Romantic period. As the number of woodwind, brass, and percussion instruments increased, the size of each string section also increased in order to balance the output of the different sections of the orchestra.


Orchestral Tubular Bells was everything that I’d hoped for. I hadn’t heard the album since around the time of its release, but had to agree with the comment from Neil Jellis, who had organised the tickets for the evening, that if you hadn’t heard the original, the music could well have been a classical composition. It’s possible that Bedford’s arrangement, while true to the recording, was the spur to Oldfield’s remastering of the classic album in 2009 in an attempt to bring out buried layers; the orchestral version does this so well. One of the very few weak spots on the original, as much for the stomping rhythm as the vocals, is the ‘Piltdown Man’ section on side two, a nod to the perceived belief it was necessary to have singing on the album, which is covered much better by an orchestra. Another of the highlights was the guest appearance of Steve Hillage on guitar. There’s a brilliant YouTube clip of Hillage with the London Philharmonic playing Orchestral Tubular Bells at the Royal Albert Hall in 1974, causing consternation or confusion (or both) for one of the double bassists. Invited to play the music again, he had swapped his Stratocaster for a Steinberg GL2T, lost the woolly hat and wore his hair at a more conventional length. After a cautious start he provided a surprisingly clean-toned blues-heavy solo, before switching on the distortion and giving us a tantalising glimpse of his trademark glissando guitar at the end of his appearance. He left the stage to rousing applause while the orchestra ploughed into the Sailor’s Hornpipe section, and they too were given an ovation that may have taken some of them by surprise.



The possibilities afforded to composers since the birth of electronic instruments together with a willingness to explore different fields ensured that formal music progressed. The appropriation of classical music forms by rock musicians from the late 60s onwards marked the birth of progressive rock. David Bedford was equally at home in both camps, at the forefront of a movement ensuring that all forms of music could be appreciated by everyone and anyone.









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